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the designbar by
note designstudio

THE DESIGN
BAR BY
NOTE DESIGN
STUDIO

    Architects: Note Design Studio
    Photography: Benjamin Lund, Teklan & Mathias Nero
 

This year’s pop up restaurant ’Sulla Bocca di Tutti’ at the Stockholm Furniture Fair was a merging of Scandinavian and Italian aesthetics, meant to feel like a warm embrace in the coldest month of the year.

 

Each year, the Stockholm Furniture Fair asks a prominent designer or design team to create their design bar. For the 2017 fair, the choice fell upon the Stockholm-based Note Design Studio.

The name of the restaurant ‘Sulla Bocca di Tutti’ – Italian for ‘On Everybody’s Lips’ – was chosen to complement its Italian menu and to illustrate how the Design Bar often becomes the center of the fair; the go to place where people meet with clients and catch up with their friends and colleagues.

/   Johannes Carlström
– Interior architect / Founder at Note

“THE FAIR IS IN FEBRUARY, AND STOCKHOLM IS SUPER COLD - A HOSTILE ENVIRONMENT! WE WANTED TO CREATE SOMETHING THAT IS SOFT AND WARM; LIKE A PLACE THAT YOU REALLY WANT TO GO TO.”

 

Since the Design Bar area was a completely open space, Note Design Studio worked a lot with creating different levels, layers and volume. It was very important that the guests did not feel like they were sitting in an open area. Therefore, small screens and greenery were inserted between the different areas; making the various dining settings more secluded and ‘private’. To add warmth and a feeling of comfort to the space, Note chose to work with warm hues of dusty pink and red, and to combine this with soft, curvy lines and plush furniture to add this 'generous' feeling to the space.

 

/   Susanna Wåhlin
– Interior architect at Note

“WE WANTED TO DO SOMETHING GENEROUS; GENEROUS IN HOW EVERYTHING WOULD TASTE, BUT ALSO AESTHETICALLY.”

/   Susanna Wåhlin
– Interior architect at Note

“WE ALWAYS SOMEHOW WORK WITH PINK TONES IN OUR CONCEPTS. I GUESS WE ALL JUST LIKE THE WARM GLOW OF THE COLOR. COLORS CAN BE A NICE WAY OF KEEPING SUCH A BIG AREA TOGETHER AND CAN MAKE IT QUITE OBVIOUS AND CLEAR FROM AFAR.”

 

Johannes Carlström, co-founder of Note Design Studio, explains how they deliberately did not want to create a 'perfect match' when choosing the color combinations, which were a mix of dusty pinks, terracotta hues, bright reds and darker, more brownish reds.

When looking at the different color swatches, many of the colors even seemed to clash a bit, but when combined all together it somehow became coherent; making the settings look more vibrant and interesting:

 

/   Johannes Carlström
– Interior architect / Founder

“IT IS REALLY TEMPTING TO MAKE EVERYTHING PERFECT, BUT THAT DOESN’T REALLY WORK. IT’S LIKE WHEN YOU HAVE A SWEET DRINK, YOU MAY ADD SOME BITTER TO IT AND IT GETS BETTER. YOU NEED A LITTLE SOMETHING THAT POPS OUT. WE AIMED FOR GOOD COMBINATIONS BUT ALSO SOMETHING THAT IS A BIT OFF, AND I THINK THAT MAKES THE WHOLE BETTER.”

pwc
australia’s new
client-centric office spaces

PWC
AUSTRALIA’S NEW
CLIENT-CENTRIC
OFFICE SPACES

    Architects: Futurespace
    Photography: Nicole England
 

Bringing new perspectives to the traditional ways of interacting with clients and co-workers, PwC Australia’s new state-of-the-art offices in Sydney and Melbourne are radically transforming how corporate workspaces can be designed by creating a customer-centric environment of co-creation, community and home-feeling. The project was undertaken in collaboration with interior agency Futurespace, using a wide selection of Muuto designs as key components in the project

 
 

For the space, both PwC and Futurespace wanted to raise the bar as to how a company can engage with clients, creating a working environment that feels like home the second you enter it. By having an open and friendly setting, PwC are able to welcome clients into their ‘work home’ in a relaxed and easy fashion. As Peter Konidaris from PwC Melbourne explains, the emphasis was on creating spaces that encourages co-creation and collaboration, moving away from “a transactional mindset to a far more relational approach to how we engage with our clients. Here we can sit with our clients and have a bite to eat, introduce them to other clients and other people in the firm.”

 
 
 

The idea of creating a feeling of home was integral to the selection of furniture for the space—these had to hold an intimate, modern expression while suiting the formal and ergonomic needs of a busy working environment. Here, Muuto designs go hand-in-hand with the surrounding environment, helping to set the vibe and atmosphere for the space while striking the balance of comfort and aesthetic presence required for the project.

 
 

Across the whole project, Futurespace worked with different types of furniture for various settings: The use of lounge furniture in the open-area workspaces should encourage collaboration and free conversation. On the other hand, semi-private and private meeting settings begged for more formal designs to set the tone for discussions and problem-solving across the organization. Bringing new perspectives to the traditional ways of interacting with clients and co-workers, PwC Australia’s new state-of-the-art offices in Sydney and Melbourne are radically transforming how corporate workspaces can be designed by creating a customer-centric environment of co-creation, community and home-feeling. The project was undertaken in collaboration with interior agency Futurespace, using a wide selection of Muuto designs as key components in the project.

/   Angela Ferguson, Director of Futurespace.

“There’s nothing else like this in Australia and I don’t think there will be for a long time because it has set a new bar for how organizations interact with their clients.”

 
okko hotels
making guestsfeel at home

OKKO HOTELS
MAKING GUESTS
FEEL AT HOME

    Architect: Patrick Norguet
    Photography: Jérôme Galland
 

Setting out to bring a new perspective to the way hotels look, feel and are lived in, OKKO wanted to create a modern, temporary ‘home’ suitable for both business and leisure. For their latest string of locations, OKKO allied themselves with iconic French designer Patrick Norguet to rethink the feelings of a hotel, using Muuto designs along the way.

 
 

Quite unconventionally, Patrick Norguet never received a brief when creating the design for the new OKKO hotels. Instead, it was up to himself to shape the design of the interiors. As Norguet explains:

“Everything started with a strong concept. We decided to remove all the traditional and somewhat outdated elements of the stereotypical hotel and replace them with modern tools in a digital context; wanting to simplify the experience and once again place the guest at the center. At OKKO, there is no check-in or check-out, no room key, and the mini bar has been replaced with an actual bar where you can enjoy drinks or food free of charge whenever it suits you. It all boiled down to a desire for the guests to feel as they would when in their own home.”

/   Patrick Norguet, Architect

“Creating a hotel is first and foremost an act of generosity. Sure, the elements of architecture and interior design play their part, but what is really important is the experience people get when inhabiting the spaces. Interiors are only meaningful when they can impact and enhance the emotions of the people present within them.”

 
 

Within each design process, Norguet tries to bring with him a great deal of ‘naivety’—wanting to approach a project without preconceived expectations:
“It enables me to create something unique. In a time where we are bombarded with so many things that look alike, singularity is a key principal to me when designing. This played into OKKO as well, working not to reach a particular atmosphere but instead to create a unique space in which people could relax and feel at ease.”